Tag Archives: blogs

Brain Scans Yield Clues to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Findings might help doctors diagnose the baffling condition.

 

It’s not a secret that ME/CFS is a very difficult illness to diagnose.  Patients presenting multi-symptom complaints are often misdiagnosed or labeled as hypochondriacs.

There are clear differences in the brains of people with ME/CFS and the brains of healthy people, new research indicates.  One of the many symptoms is inflammation of the brain, shown by MRIs.

ME/CFS affects up to 4 million people in the United States alone.  This assessment (updated from a year ago’s 1 million) is reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The History of M.E (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis)

The History and Present of M.E (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis)

[Myalgic Encephalomyelitis]/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is one of the greatest scientific and medical challenges of our time,” said the study’s senior author, Dr. Jose Montoya, professor of infectious diseases and geographic medicine, in a Stanford report.

ME/CFS patients in the U.S. number more than MS and AIDS patients added together, yet, government funding for MS and AIDS research has been 4 times that of ME/CFS in recent years!

Despite the HHS, CDC, NIH et al’s negative and misguided attitudes of the last several years, and particularly the problems with IOM (Institute of Medicine) and P2P (Pathways to Prevention) Workshop, I have the distinct impression that there is more focus on finding a solution to the problems of ME/CFS than ever before.

Research in Nevada, and California is getting ramped up through mostly private funding.  If we depended upon the HHS’s funding up to now, nothing would be progressing in the necessary research; in fact, HHS has been doing everything it can to prevent progression in research.  My past posts on M.E. Advocacy will shed light on that.

The very active WordPress, Blogspot (Google) blogs and Twitter accounts of ME/CFS patients and advocates that I find, proves that we (ME/CFS patients and advocates) are not sitting on our hands in this fight.

As sick as so many patients and patient-advocates are, there is an inner strength (digging very deep down to find) that keeps everyone pushing to their limits and beyond.  And, they suffer physically for it for many days, weeks, months or even years.  More than 3 decades of being pushed aside and told “it’s all in your head and go see a psychiatrist for your depression” means it must stop.  NOW.

 

[Image from bingdotcom]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April is National Poetry Writing Month

I didn’t know about this until there was a WordPress.com News blog listed in my email inbox.  The longer I keep blogging and reading, the more I’m learning about all different “months,” holidays, and general goings-on in our nation and in the world.

If I keep learning at least one new thing each day of my life, when I finally die, it will be the passing of one of the smartest people in the world!!!  Ha.

“April is National Poetry Month. Established in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets, its purpose is to increase the attention paid to the art of poetry, to our poetic heritage, and to poetry books and magazines.” ~  Shel Silverstein

April is National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month

NaPoWriMo.net  started blogging last year, and blogs for only the months of April and May, according to its schedule from last year.  It is a hugely encouraging blog, with great links, and I recommend taking a look if you are a poet or are thinking of starting; it offers great help with writing poetry.

Sheri Lucas Rowlands, in her blog, gives great hints as to how to make your poem more interesting, by placement of spaces, by indenting and outdenting (I never heard of that one, but it is so basic in the form used!), and other ideas.

I expect that more poetry might be used in blogging this month!  Guapo, your limericks and those of your commentors, gave this month of National Poetry Writing a great start!

Learn how to write your own limericks.

Learn how to write your own limericks.