Category Archives: Feminism

Body Image Experiment

Speaking of making a statement!!

kraftycatcreations

For many decades, the media has idealized their image of the “perfect woman”, going so far as to photo-shop pictures of models to inhuman proportions. Culture dictates that looks are important. The message comes across to females of all ages and shapes that they do not measure up. For many women, this expectation can damage their self-esteem.
In recent years, a backlash has been building against the media’s message, and rightly so. Many women, along with some men, are speaking out, their message being that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes. It is time for us to be comfortable in our own skin.
In the following video, presented by HLN, Amy Pence-Brown puts her message forth by stripping down to her underwear in the middle of an outdoor market. The response is heartwarming.

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TED talk: Jimmy Carter Why I believe the mistreatment of women is the number one human rights abuse

I had no idea that Jimmy Carter was a supporter of Women’s Rights. It was a pleasure to listen to him on this video.

A Very Different Post From Sunshinebright!

 

Sunshinebright (aka Carol) is really a fun-loving older woman, living in South Florida, USA.  Love music and fun videos.  Daughter sent a link to the following video a long time ago.  Found it in email inbox while cleaning out old ones.

Warning:  The musicians and players are not young; however, you will start to wiggle in your seat and toes will start tapping.  Some skin is exposed, but no nudity.

CNN’s Christiane Amanpour To Moderate A Live Exclusive Town Hall With Former Secretary Of State Hillary Rodham Clinton Following The Release Of Her New Book, “Hard Choices”

Anyone interested in Hillary Clinton is advised to watch the Town Hall meeting and moderated by Christiane Amanpour. It should be an interesting session.

CNN Press Room

CNN chief international correspondent Christiane Amanpour will moderate the only network televised town hall with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Tuesday, June 17th at 5 pm ET. The special broadcast before a live audience selected by CNN, will take place at the Newseum in Washington DC. The Town Hall will air on CNN and simulcast worldwide on CNN International and CNN en Espanol.

Hillary Clinton will discuss her new memoir “Hard Choices.” The book, which goes on sale on June 10th, tells the story of the former first lady’s four years as America’s top diplomat. She will take questions from Amanpour and members of the public with no subjects off limits. Leading up to the broadcast, Jake Tapper will anchor a special hour of The Lead live from the Newseum. Following the Town Hall, Wolf Blitzer will anchor The Situation Room from the Newseum where he will speak…

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Comic Relief

I send emails back and forth with many friends, and I received one with this message:

If my body was a car, I would be trading it in for a newer model.  I’ve got bumps, dents, scratches & my headlights are out of focus. My gear box is seizing up & it takes me hours to reach maximum speed. Overheat for no reason and every time I sneeze, cough or laugh either my radiator leaks or my exhaust backfires!

I forwarded the message to several friends, and the following response was the best of the lot:

“My toaster just set off the fire alarm.  Entered my code three times trying to turn it off.  Only after placing the toaster outside did the system accept the code and turn off the alarm.  The alarm was surprisingly loud with the front door & garage open as an un-neighborly neighbor passing by showed no concern of me or the property’s well being.

So I appreciate the comic relief.  Perfect timing and utterly fantastic.  I will pass it on.”

Florida Atlantic University Student’s Achievement in Varying Degrees

Here’s a big ray of sunshine from the Sunshine State:  A sixteen-year-old student has simultaneously earned her high school diploma AND her bachelor’s in criminal justice.

Grace Bush, 16-year-old student from Hollywood, FL, has earned her HS diploma and her BS from college, simultaneously.

Grace Bush, 16-year-old student from Hollywood, FL, has earned her HS diploma and her BS from college, simultaneously.  Photo from Sun-Sentinel.

Grace is one of 9 children, all home-schooled by their mother, Gisla Bush.  Two of her sisters and a cousin also have achieved similar goals at very young ages and are continuing their educations.

Grace is planning to earn her master’s degree and then attend law school. What is her ultimate goal?  She plans to become the Chief Justice of the United States!  I believe she is well on her way!!

If you want to read more about this story, click here.

International Women’s Day-March 8th

I was perusing my emails and came upon an Avon newsletter, proclaiming that today was International Women’s Day.  I never knew that we women had a special day set aside for us across the globe.  As a matter of fact, the Secretary-General of the United Nations proclaimed:

Equality for women is progress for all

“Countries with more gender equality have better economic growth. Companies with more women leaders perform better. Peace agreements that include women are more durable. Parliaments with more women enact more legislation on key social issues such as health, education, anti-discrimination and child support. The evidence is clear: equality for women means progress for all.”

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

Map of World-Intl Women's Day

International Women’s Day-March 8th

Being a woman, and a feminist, I find this all very interesting and quite positive.  Here is a history of the formation of and observance of International Women’s Day which I found after doing some research:

International Women’s Day has been observed since in the early 1900’s, a time of great expansion and turbulence in the industrialized world that saw booming population growth and the rise of radical ideologies.

1908
Great unrest and critical debate was occurring among women.   Women’s oppression and inequality was spurring women to become more vocal and active in campaigning for change. Then in 1908, 15,000 women marched through New York City demanding shorter hours, better pay and voting rights.

1909
In accordance with a declaration by the Socialist Party of America, the first National Woman’s Day (NWD) was observed across the United States on  February 28th. Women continued to celebrate NWD on the last Sunday of February until 1913.

1910
n 1910 a second International Conference of Working Women was held in Copenhagen. A woman named a Clara Zetkin (Leader of the ‘Women’s Office’ for the Social Democratic Party in Germany) tabled the idea of an International Women’s Day. She proposed that every year in every country there should be a celebration on the same day – a Women’s Day – to press for their demands. The conference of over 100 women from 17 countries, representing unions, socialist parties, working women’s clubs, and including the first three women elected to the Finnish parliament, greeted Zetkin’s suggestion with unanimous approval and thus International Women’s Day was the result.

1911
Following the decision agreed at Copenhagen in 1911, International Women’s Day (IWD) was honored the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on 19 March. More than one million women and men attended IWD rallies campaigning for women’s rights to work, vote, be trained, to hold public office and end discrimination. However, less than a week later on March 25th, the tragic ‘Triangle Fire’ in New York City took the lives of more than 140 working women, most of them Italian and Jewish immigrants. This disastrous event drew significant attention to working conditions and labor legislation in the United States and became a focus of subsequent International Women’s Day events. 1911 also saw women’s ‘Bread and Roses‘ campaign.

1913-1914
On the eve of World War I, campaigning for peace, Russian women observed their first International Women’s Day on the last Sunday in February 1913.   In 1913 following discussions, International Women’s Day was transferred to March 8, and this day has remained the global date for International Women’s Day ever since. In 1914 more women across Europe held rallies to campaign against the war and to express women’s solidarity.

1917
On the last Sunday of February, Russian women began a strike for “bread and peace” in response to the death over 2 million Russian soldiers in war. Opposed by political leaders,, the women continued to strike until four days later, the Czar was forced to abdicate and the provisional Government granted women the right to vote. The date the women’s strike commenced was Sunday February 23rd on the Julian calendar then in use in Russia. This day on the Gregorian calendar in use elsewhere was March 8th.

1918 – 1999
Since its birth in the socialist movement, International Women’s Day has grown to become a global day of recognition and celebration across developed and developing countries alike. For decades, IWD has grown from strength to strength annually. For many years the United Nations has held an annual IWD conference to coordinate international efforts for women’s rights and participation in social, political and economic processes. 1975 was designated as ‘International Women’s Year‘ by the United Nations. Women’s organizations and governments around the world have also observed IWD annually on March 8th, by holding large-scale events that honor women’s advancement, while diligently being a reminder of the continued vigilance and action required to ensure that women’s equality is gained and maintained in all aspects of life.

2000 and beyond
IWD is now an official holiday in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China (for women only), Cuba, Georgia, Guinea-Bissau, Eritrea, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Madagascar (for women only), Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Nepal (for women only), Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and Zambia. The tradition sees men honoring their mothers, wives, girlfriends, colleagues, etc., with flowers and small gifts. In some countries IWD has the equivalent status of Mother’s Day where children give small presents to their mothers and grandmothers.

Its Our Day

The new millennium has witnessed a significant change and attitudinal shift in both women’s and society’s thoughts about women’s equality and emancipation. Many from a younger generation feel that ‘all the battles have been won for women’ while many feminists from the 1970’s know only too well the longevity and ingrained complexity of patriarchy. With more women in the boardroom, greater equality in legislative rights, and an increased critical mass of women’s visibility as impressive role models in every aspect of life, one could think that women have gained true equality. The unfortunate fact is that women are still not paid equally to that of their male counterparts; women still are not present in equal numbers in business or politics; and globally, women’s education, health and the violence against them is worse than that of men.

However, great improvements have been made. We do have female astronauts and prime ministers.  Are we aligning ourselves for having a woman in the White House?  Women have real choices.  And so, the tone and nature of IWD has, for the past few years, moved from being a reminder about the negatives to a celebration of the positives.

HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY!!