Category Archives: Aging

Rest In Peace, Mr. Fix-It

rest in peace

Today, I was unfortunate to attend a funeral for a very dear man.  Marty was our neighbor and loved by everyone in our community.  A great loss, for sure.  He lived to serve.

Marty was happiest when helping others.  He was our talented handyman, and when anyone in our community needed assistance with a door or a window or a lock or anything around the house, Marty was your man.  I believe there isn’t a person living here who didn’t receive Marty’s help with something.

Personally speaking, Marty assisted me by re-routing an outside pipe leading from the hose connection to a hose reel; climbing a ladder in the garage to install a new heavy battery for the garage door opener; changed the batteries in the smoke detector alarms; and convinced me and many of my neighbors to get a carbon monoxide detector.  He was so happy to install them all.

We have a community newspaper here where I live, and Marty submitted a new article for every issue.  The subject was usually how to help ourselves to be safe in our homes and in the community.  We learned a great deal from his expertise.

Marty was also our amateur magician.  He loved to perform in our clubhouse; usually before some event, just to “get things started.”  He always made us laugh with his hi-jinx, costumes, props, and comical imitations.  It’s very possible he got some of his tricks from the following book:

amateur

Whether you needed a little encouragement if you were feeling down, or not, Marty always had a great short story or one-liner that was guaranteed to at least make you smile.

The chapel held seats for 160 people; however, when the services began, it was SRO.  Several people from our community stood up and spoke about how Marty’s caring affected them.  One person mentioned that people in show business and sports were highly regarded and when performing, people in the audience and in the sports stadiums stood and applauded.  Well, he suggested we should all stand and applaud Marty as a way of showing our admiration and love for him, as we say “goodbye” to him one final time.  It was as if this was rehearsed, because everyone stood up as one rippling wave, and we very gladly put our hands together and sent Marty on his way to a beautiful, peaceful place, riding on that wave.

Meryl Streep Is Such A Wise Woman

 

Meryl Streep is one of my favorite actresses.  Thanks to Dr. Rex’s blog, It Is What It Is, I found Meryl even more likeable after reading her personal take on her life.

Meryl touches all important bases in her life and in mine as well.  I’ve come a long way on the path of my life, and I know what’s important to make me a happy person.  I believe Meryl’s personal life mantra can reach out and touch so many more.

meryl streep

I No Longer…..

“I no longer have patience for certain things, not because I’ve become arrogant, but simply because I reached a point in my life where I do not want to waste more time with what displeases me or hurts me.  I have no patience for cynicism, excessive criticism, and demands of any nature.  I lost the will to please those who do not like me; to love those who do not love me, and to smile at those who do  not want to smile at  me.

I no longer spend a single minute on those who lie or want to manipulate.  I decided not to coexist anymore with pretense, hypocrisy, dishonesty and cheap praise.  I do not tolerate selective erudition nor academic arrogance.  I do not adjust either to popular gossiping. I hate conflict and comparisons.  I believe in a world of opposites and that’s why I avoid people with rigid and inflexible personalities.  In friendship, I dislike the lack of loyalty, and betrayal.  I do not get along with those who do not know how to give a compliment or a word of encouragement.  Exaggerations bore me and I have difficulty accepting those who do not like animals.  And on top of everything, I have no patience for anyone who does not deserve my patience.”

~Meryl Streep

[Image from bingdotcom]

A Very Different Post From Sunshinebright!

 

Sunshinebright (aka Carol) is really a fun-loving older woman, living in South Florida, USA.  Love music and fun videos.  Daughter sent a link to the following video a long time ago.  Found it in email inbox while cleaning out old ones.

Warning:  The musicians and players are not young; however, you will start to wiggle in your seat and toes will start tapping.  Some skin is exposed, but no nudity.

Betty White’s 93rd Birthday Flash Mob

I don’t know if you have noticed that I VERY RARELY reblog another’s blog post. Thanks to Horty Rex of “It Is What It Is,” I felt impelled to reblog this wonderful Flashdance in honor of Betty White’s 93rd birthday. She has always been a favorite of mine. Thank you, Horty, and thanks also to “Tell Me About It” by Michelle Marie for the original post.

Tell Me About It

(✿◠‿◠) Happy Birthday Betty White
I love this what a beautiful gift
I want to do this, too much fun.
I love at the end when her
Hot in Cleveland co-stars danced
she cried. We should all spread happiness
like this~(✿◠‿◠)

Have you ever been in a flash mob?

View original post

December Represents Mixed Emotions

month

December has different meanings for different people.  Excitement, happiness, celebration, life expectations, new beginnings, and end of a life (lives) as we knew it.

holidays

What does the month of December represent to me?

Going back to the year 1958, December was great cause for celebration, life expectations, and a new beginning.  I married my first husband, Danny – my best friend, the father of my children.  My soul mate.  Yes, it is real.  There really is such a thing.

December means the birth of my son.  I was totally prepared for his arrival, and was joyous at his birth.

December means the month in which my now deceased granddaughter was born.

December means celebration of Hanukkah.  A time to be close to family and light the Menorah and remember the discovery of one day’s oil in the biblical temple which, miraculously, lasted eight days, to keep the temple’s light burning until more oil was found.

December means the loss of my soul mate.  It was expected, after many months’ illness, but when it happened, I had to cope with the great emptiness that his death left after 34 years of deep love.

December means the discovery of a new love, and a decision to devote myself to another.  It was a very good decision.  Bob was a special guy and very devoted to me, and I was happy with him.  We had a loving relationship and there was respect for one another.

December means the loss of my Bob after more than a year’s illness.  We were married for 18 1/2 years, and they were very good years.  They went very fast.

December is a time for remembering:  Taking stock of the past and looking forward to another year of whatever life brings.  It brings surprises – the unexpected; that’s for sure.

What does December mean to you?

Did You Know Your Relationships Affect Your Health?

I came across an article about a class that was given at Stanford University.  It is about the relationships between husband and wife and between women, with the emphasis on the positives that come out of relationships among women friends, and how the relationships affect their health.  I believe it bears sharing, so here it is:

In an evening class at Stanford, the lecture was on the mind-body connection – the relationship between stress, disease and health.  The speaker (head of psychiatry at Stanford) said, among other things, that one of the best things that a man could do for his health is to be married to a woman with whom he is happy; whereas, for a woman, one of the best things she could do for her health was to nurture her relationships with her girlfriends.

women talk

At first everyone laughed, but he was serious.

Women connect with each other differently.  They provide support systems that help each other to deal with stress and difficult life experiences.  Physically this quality “girlfriend time” helps women to create more serotonin – a neurotransmitter – that helps combat depression and can create a general feeling of well being.

Women share feelings; whereas, men often form relationships around activities.  They rarely sit down with a buddy and talk about how they feel about certain things or how their personal lives are going.  Jobs?  Yes.  Sports?  Yes.  Cars?  Yes.  Fishing, hunting, golf?  Yes.  But their feelings?  Rarely.

men playing golf

Women do it all of the time.  They share from their souls with their sisters, mothers, close friends and evidently that is very good for their health.

The lecturer said that when women spend time with a friend, it is just as important to their general health as jogging or working out at a gym.

There’s a tendency to think that when people are “exercising,” they are doing something good for their bodies, and when we are hanging out with friends, we are wasting our time and should be more productively engaged.  This is not true.  In fact, he said that failure to create and maintain quality personal relationships with other humans is as dangerous to our physical health as smoking!

So every time you hang out to schmooze with a gal pal, just pat yourself on the back and congratulate yourself for doing something good for your health!  Women are indeed very, very lucky.

Sooooo… let’s toast to our friendship with our girlfriends.  Evidently it’s very good for our health.

 

[images from bingdotcom]

 

 

This 101-Year Old Woman Is Amazing And So Is Her Car

My cousin emailed a link to a youtube video that I want to share with you all.  I, like many of my followers, are starting to feel the vulnerability of approaching “old age.”  This video should give us all hope that our “golden years” (some call them the “rusty years”) will be as pleasant as we hope they will be.

Enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/embed/qxCpK1W_Gjw?feature=player_embedded


Baby Boomers, Take Note

The National Institutes of Health commissioned the U.S. Census Bureau to report the population trends and other national data about people 65 and older.  The results are presented in a report entitled, 65+ in the United States: 2010.

The report documents aging as quite varied in terms of how long people live, how well they age, their financial and educational status, their medical and long-term care and housing costs, where they live and with whom, and other factors important for aging and health.  Rates of smoking and excessive drinking have declined among older Americans, prevalence of chronic disease has risen, and many older Americans are unprepared to afford the costs of long-term care in a nursing home.

Some good news, and some not so good news.

Aging in America is changing in fundamental ways. The report provides the number of older people and their age, sex, and race; it also tells us about their health, families, communities and future problems with caregiving, vital data to consider as we seek to meet the needs and address concerns of our aging population. The older population today is increasingly diverse, on a number of fronts.

Baby Boomers, take note:  A key aspect of the report is the effect that the aging of the baby boom generation — those born between 1946 and 1964 — will have on the U.S. population and on society in general. Baby boomers began to reach age 65 in 2011; between 2010 and 2020, the older generation is projected to grow more rapidly than in any other decade since 1900.

baby boomers soc sec card

Rates of smoking and excessive alcohol consumption have declined among those 65 and older, as mentioned above, but the percentage of overweight and obese people has increased. Between 2003-2006, 72 percent of older men and 67 percent of older women were overweight or obese. Obesity is associated in increased rates of diabetes, arthritis, and impaired mobility, and in some cases with higher death rates.

Research based on NIA’s (National Institute on Aging) Health and Retirement Study suggests that the prevalence of chronic diseases, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic lung disease, and diabetes, increased among older people between 1998 and 2008. For example, in 2008, 41 percent of the older population had three or more chronic conditions, 51 percent had one or two, and only 8 percent had no chronic conditions.

long term care 2

The cost of long-term care varies by care setting. The average cost of a private room in a nursing home was $229 per day or $83,585 per year in 2010. Less than one-fifth of older people have the personal financial resources to live in a nursing home for more than three years and almost two-thirds cannot afford even one year. Medicare provides coverage in a skilled nursing facility to older and disabled patients for short time periods following hospitalization. Medicaid covers long-term care in certified facilities for qualifying low-income seniors. In 2006, Medicaid paid for 43 percent of long-term care.

Most of the long-term care provided to older people today comes from unpaid family members and friends.

Most of the long-term care provided to older people today comes from unpaid family members and friends.

Baby boomers had far fewer children than their parents. Combined with higher divorce rates and disrupted family structures, this will result in fewer family members to provide long-term care in the future. This will become more serious as people live longer with conditions such as cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer’s.

It is hoped that this report will serve as a useful resource to policymakers, researchers, educators, students and the public at large.

The good news is, if we are aware about possible problems in the coming years, we have a better chance to plan ahead.

 

[images from bingdotcom]