Florida’s Slow-Moving Medical Marijuana Bill

 

It was in 2014, that Florida’s legislature passed a medical marijuana bill – please see my previous post on Florida’s medical marijuana bill.  And, to date, no one has been helped.

One of the things holding it up is the fact that only 5 growers would have been allowed to grow the specific Charlotte’s Web strain under the current law.

A bill proposed for the 2015 legislature session never got a hearing.

Another bill has been filed for the 2016 session.  Supposedly, that limit of number of growers would be removed; and currently, only cancer patients and seizure sufferers are covered.  The number of eligible diseases would be increased.  Those that would be added include:

  • HIV/AIDS
  • MS (multiple sclerosis)
  • Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS – amyotrophic lateral sclerosis)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • or any terminal illness.

Of course, the thing bogging down the implementation of the current law is RED TAPE.  So, what else is new?  The Florida Department of Health is in the fray, and nursery owners’ litigation is attempting to position their companies in the small “pot” of eligibility.

As you can imagine, families of sick members are keenly frustrated and angry with these legislative shenanigans while their ill family members of all ages are crying out for relief from their debilitating, painful symptoms.

Will we ever see a medical marijuana bill coming out of the Florida legislature?  Last year’s legislature passed that 2014 bill, hoping to have the “topic” done with. The passage was timed to take place before the last mid-term election.  They believed there was a great possibility that the voters would pass the amendment to the Florida constitution.  As it turned out, the voters missed out on that passage by approximately 2% of the required 60%.

There is a difference between passing a bill into law, and having the voters pass an amendment to the state’s Constitution.  A big difference!  A law can be changed at the whim of the state’s legislature at any time; however, an amendment needs to be added by the state’s voters.  The Florida legislature would rather keep control of the medical marijuana “problem,” and be able to change at will.  That’s why that legislative body wanted so desperately, to be able to pass a law and not wait for a possible state constitutional change.

Things are looking very good for the passage of an amendment in next year’s election.  More on that in another post.

 

[ header image from http://www.freewebheaders.com ]

 

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